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Date/Time
Date(s) - Friday, 24th November 2017
All Day

Location
The Exchange Blackburn


At the dawn of the 20th century, Robert Edward Hart lived a quiet life in Blackburn, managing the family rope-making business. Few people realised he was spending his family’s wealth to create one of Britain’s most impressive book and coin collections. Using interviews, letters, business records, and Hart’s personal notes, this creative theatre show takes audiences into the quiet but imaginative world of one of the Britain’s most important collectors. Staged in London in Senate House, and in Blackburn at the Blackburn Museum and Art Gallery, and the historic Blackburn Cotton Exchange.

The event will be followed by a wine reception in the Blackburn Museum and Art Gallery.

Book tickets here: http://sas.sym-online.com/registrationforms/iesbooking20798/

Disclaimer: Audience enters the Blackburn Cotton Exchange at their own risk. The organisers take no responsibility for injury to audience participants whatsoever. There is no emergency lighting, banisters, toilets, or disabled access on the site.

This is an old building with risks involved to all those who enter it.

Every effort has been made to ensure that loose masonry or other hazards on the walls have been removed. All ceiling tiles have been checked to ensure they are well fixed. Other areas have been netted where it was not possible to ensure safety. Hard hats may no longer be required therefore.
There have been pigeons in the building, so the dust will contain pigeon droppings. There are no pigeons now and there has been a huge effort to reduce the dust, so face masks are not required.
It is not possible to visit the site without being accompanied. Cordoned off areas are very unsafe and include holes in the floor, so do not cross a cordon.
There is temporary lighting, so high visibility jackets are not required. There are no emergency lights.


There is no disabled access or exit and there are no toilets.
There is one fire exit at the back of the building, but this is through a cordoned off area.

Being Human is led by the School of Advanced Study, University of London in partnership with the Arts & Humanities Research Council and the British Academy.

It’s an exciting year for the Being Human Festival. In the just three years since we started, we have nearly doubled our number of events and our number of cultural partners, while establishing an annual footfall of over 30,000 participants from all over the country. In 2016 the festival featured activities in 45 towns and cities across the UK. This year, we will continue to showcase the best, most exciting and innovative humanities research around the country, from Belfast to Dundee, from Glasgow to East Anglia, from Swansea to Nottingham, and everywhere in between. We have events about the history of language and music, walking tours of landscapes and cities, explorations of art and the senses, and for the first time we have opened up a strand on the history and culture of sport, including events on cricket and British wrestling.